Archaeologists have discovered the partial remains of a female thought to have died over a millennium ago and nearly 10,000 feet up in Mongolia’s Altai Mountains. Only one hand and and a pair of feet remain of the very old woman’s body, but it’s what was found on her feet that has really been causing a stir.

The mummy appears to be wearing a pair of trainers sporting the iconic three-stripe logo of the German sportswear brand Adidas. The stitching, stripes and soles all look remarkably similar to that of an Adidas trainer. “The mummy had on some Adidas in the first pic?” wrote a LiveLeak user.

Some have been claiming the photo, which can be seen on the next page, is proof of time travel. How else could a 1,500-year-old mummy be sporting a pair of shoes that look so eerily similar to our modern trainers?

Turkik mummy in Mongolia Must Credit: Khovd Museum/ The Siberian Times queries Will Stewart 007 985 9

B Sukhbaatar, a researcher at Khovd Museum, told the Siberian Times: “This person was not from elite, and we believe it was likely a woman, because there is no bow in the tomb. Now we are carefully unwrapping the body and once this is complete the specialists will be able to say more precisely about the gender. The grave was three metres deep. The finds show us that these people were very skilled craftsmen.”

Found along with the mummy’s remains were a saddle, bridle, clay vase, wooden bowl, trough, iron kettle, and an entire horse. B Sukhbaatar explains: “It is the first complete Turkik burial at least in Mongolia – and probably in all Central Asia. This is a very rare phenomenon. These finds show us the beliefs and rituals of Turkiks. We can see clearly that the horse was deliberately sacrificed. It was a mare, between four and eight years old.”

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“An interesting thing we found is that not only sheep wool was used, but also camel wool. We can date the burial by the things we have found there, also the type of hat. It gives us a preliminary date of around the 6th century AD.”

Turkik mummy in Mongolia Must Credit: Khovd Museum/ The Siberian Times queries Will Stewart 007 985 9